Thursday, October 6, 2016

Ashvamedha - Book Review


Ashvamedha
By Aparna Sinha
Review By Ila Garg


Ashvamedha, a novel by Aparna Sinha, is published by Srishti Publishers. The cover shows a horse from the chess board and a shadow of the real horse. The animal represents power and vigour, and resonates well with the subtitle of the book – The Game of Power.

Aparna Sinha wrote her first poem when she was seven, which she recited on All India Radio. Since then, her literary work and industry specific articles have been published in various media, including reputed business magazines across Asia.

Equipped with a Master's in management, when she was forced to quit her lucrative job because of a chronic disease, she focused on her sole passion – writing. Ashvamedha is her literary debut.

The blurb reads as, “You have to dethrone a powerful man to become the most powerful. I was itching to defeat the single most powerful person, but there wasn't any. I was left with only one choice — to create one.
Little does Ashwin Jamwal know that the last twenty-five years of his life have been controlled by a master manipulator, who wanted to make him the most powerful man on earth, though for a reason! Ashwin steps up to take oath as the youngest Prime Minister of India and is unknowingly thrown into a vortex of power and authority as the entire world is threatened by a faceless enemy — Hades.
The world starts to look up to Ashwin as the savior, but he was just a pawn, reared only to be sacrificed in the end.
A story of greed, lies, deceptions, manipulations and corruption, Ashvamedha is a thriller revolving around the infamous game of power in a maddening bid to seek absolute control.”

Instances of dirty politics and corruption are spilled over in the book. The romance between Ashwin Jamwal and Adya is another highlight of the book. So is the friendship between Arun and Ashwin. The two friends, Arun and Ashwin are both adopted and inseparable.

There is no expectation in the relation of Ashwin and Adya, and yet true love does exist between them. Their tragic moment comes when they have to separate. Their lives take a drastic turn when Ashwin becomes the Prime Minister of India, which is also the opening scene of the book.

The story moves smoothly and deals with matters of love and friendship and power-play. The characterisation done by Aparna is impactful. The protagonist of the story is Ashwin Jamwal, who is a mere puppet in the hands of the society as a Prime Minister. His character is well defined. He emerges as a true friend and a true lover. Arun too is a nice friend who becomes Ashwin’s confidant in all situations.

Adya as the female protagonist truly loves Ashwin Jamwal. They separate and then they bump into each other in a conference. Adya is now the topmost journalist and Ashwin is the Prime Minister of India. This meeting is very crucial for both of them. Threats from the terrorist named Hades to Ashwin, became their catalyst and brought them together again.

The language is simple and easy to comprehend. Nowhere will a reader feel any disconnect. It’s so well-written that once you pick up, you cannot keep it down without finishing it off. I found it quite engaging. The subject is tackled beautifully by the skillful author.

How Ashwin went after his aspirations and became the Prime Minister, how Ashwin and Adya went their ways only to come together again, how Arun and Ashwin maintained their friendship through all thick and thin, will Ashwin and Adya have a happily ever after, how will the game of power work are some of the many reasons why you will keep turning the pages to find out what happens in Ashvamedha – The Game of Power.

Further, this 224-page book is good enough to expose how the power can sometimes adversely work to change destinies. It’s an overall compelling book and therefore much recommended for all.

Ratings: 3.75/5


Buying Links: Amazon | Infibeam | Sapna

2 comments:

  1. I am really not a fan of such reads but would love to give it a read for sure.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah this book is a little off-beat :)

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